Bibliography: Surveillance Education (page 62 of 81)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized for the Whistleblower Defense website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Tod Schneider, Candace Falk, Lloyd B. Potter, Lisa C. Barrios, Alicia M. Betsinger, Mary Agnes Dougherty, Frances M. McDonald, Susan J. Coniglio, Shawn Moore, and Springfield. Illinois State Dept. of Public Health.

Schneider, Tod (1998). Crime Prevention through Environmental Design: School CPTED Basics. The Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) concept suggests that natural surveillance, natural access control, and territoriality can be effectively applied to schools and surrounding environments to provide safety for students and teachers. This document presents the essential concepts of the CPTED and examines how the main office within a school can serve as the critical component in safe school design. A CPTED principle suggests that a well designed office should serve as the guardian at the gate, with excellent surveillance outside and inside the school, especially up and down hallways, the entry area, parking lots, drop off areas, and playing fields. Progressively higher levels of security design for the main entry and office areas are diagramed providing benefits and disadvantages of each. (Contains 16 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Crime Prevention, Educational Facilities Design, Elementary Secondary Education, Public Schools

Falk, Candace; Reese, Lyn; Dougherty, Mary Agnes (2001). The Life and Times of Emma Goldman: A Curriculum for Middle and High School Students. Emma Goldman (1869-1940) is a major figure in the history of radicalism and feminism in the United States. In a period when the expression of controversial ideas was dangerous, Goldman insisted on her right to challenge convention. She was among the most prominent advocates of labor's right to organize, reproductive rights, sexual freedom, freedom of speech, and freedom of the individual. Goldman left an intriguing body of personal papers, including correspondence and writings; and her activities generated extensive newspaper coverage, government surveillance reports, and legal papers. The documents in this teaching unit are drawn from a massive archive collected by the Emma Goldman Papers Project at the University of California (Berkeley). They are organized into five themes or topics: (1) "Immigration"; (2) "Freedom of Expression"; (3) "Women's Rights"; (4) "Anti-militarism"; and (5) "Art and Literature of Social Change." The topics can be taught in any sequence. Each of the five themes includes suggested activities that students may use to explore the broader significance of the documents and their context. A brief introduction to Emma Goldman and a timeline are provided for students. A glossary of terms appearing in the documents is included along with a selected resources section of annotations on books, media, and literature.   [More]  Descriptors: Curriculum Enrichment, Feminism, Freedom of Speech, High Schools

Glittenberg, JoAnn E. (1989). Fogarty International Center: A Resource for International Nursing, Journal of Professional Nursing. The Fogarty International Center of the National Institutes of Health is an international research center for research training of foreign health professionals and allied health personnel, strengthening of health institutional research capability in foreign countries, direct technical assistance for disease control, and improvement of the worldwide disease surveillance system. Descriptors: Federal Programs, Fellowships, Higher Education, International Educational Exchange

Betsinger, Alicia M.; King, Christoper T. (1999). Year Two Evaluation: On the Right Track. This project report presents findings on the implementation and progress of the On the Right Track program during the second year of a four-year grant period. The project, which began in July of 1997, is designed to assess and document the magnitude, severity, and secondary conditions of disabilities for persons with disabilities in Texas, to promote healthy lifestyles for people with disabilities in Texas, and to strengthen the leadership role of the Texas Department of Health in this domain. The report provides an overview of key features of the On the Right Track program and outlines the roles and responsibilities of program partners. It briefly describes implementation during year two and presents project constraints and lessons learned. Findings from the project include the following: (1) progress has been made with respect to the state-level data review, the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System-Disability Module, and injury surveillance activities during year two; (2) numerous health promotions have occurred; (3) the release of funding to certain project partners was cited as a constraint during year two of the project; and (4) the state strategic plan for the prevention of secondary conditions was completed.   [More]  Descriptors: Adults, Children, Health Promotion, Incidence

Juvonen, Jaana (2001). School Violence: Prevalence, Fears, and Prevention. Issue Paper. School and district administrators are taking a variety of measures to improve school safety. The job of selecting an appropriate program, however, is not an easy one, considering the myriad possibilities and the need to know where to allocate precious resources. RAND examined the literature regarding these programs and found that only a handful have been evaluated, and even fewer have been deemed effective or even promising. The goal of this paper is to describe the options currently available for schools. Key components of various approaches are analyzed in terms of their potential positive and negative effects to assist administrators in the selection of policies, programs, and procedures while waiting for evaluations to be conducted. Programs considered include physical surveillance, including weapons deterrence and the presence of security guards or officers on campus; school policies designed to prevent violence by punishing those who perpetrate violence; instruction-based programs designed to address the precursors of violence, including bullying; profiling of potentially violent individuals; counseling at-risk students; and conflict mediation and resolution. While waiting for evaluations to be conducted, decision-makers can make meaningful choices by matching their goals with the primary goals of the various approaches. (Contains 30 references.) Descriptors: Elementary Secondary Education, Intervention, Prevention, Program Descriptions

World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe. (1989). HIV Seropositivity and AIDS Prevention and Control: Report on a WHO Meeting (Moscow, USSR, March 14-17, 1989). With the development of tests to detect infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), it has become possible to determine its prevalence and to monitor trends in populations. Such information is valuable in designing, implementing, and monitoring public health programs for the prevention and control of HIV and the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Before the screening of any population for HIV infection, a variety of logistic, laboratory, operational, legal, and ethical issues must be carefully considered. The design of a methodology for HIV surveillance should attempt to maximize the likelihood of obtaining accurate and useful epidemiological information about the distribution of HIV infection in the community concerned while minimizing the likelihood of adverse consequences. Each surveillance method has its limitations. Over the last few years, however, epidemiologists have increasingly advocated unlinked anonymous screening as an accurate and cost-effective method for public health surveillance of HIV infection. The main objective of the European Meeting on HIV Seropositivity and AIDS Prevention and Control was to determine how and when surveys of HIV seropositivity could be used, by reviewing their epidemiological, psychosocial, ethical and legal aspects. Such surveys would be integral components of national AIDS prevention and control programs. This report includes discussion and recommendations on the methods, problems, and usefulness of testing, on ethical and practical issues of HIV surveillance, and the scope and characteristics of effective national programs. Descriptors: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, Health Programs, Incidence, Prevention

Potter, Lloyd B.; And Others (1995). Suicide Prevention from a Public Health Perspective, Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior. The public health approach to suicide prevention consists of health-event surveillance to describe the problem, epidemiologic analysis to identify risk factors, the design and evaluation of interventions, and the implementation of prevention programs. Community suicide prevention programs should include more than one strategy and, where appropriate, should be strongly linked with the community's mental health resources. Descriptors: Community Health Services, Crisis Intervention, Epidemiology, Higher Education

Brown, Brett V. (2001). Tracking the Well-Being of Children and Youth at the State and Local Levels Using the Federal Statistical System. Occasional Paper Number 52. Assessing the New Federalism: An Urban Institute Program To Assess Changing Social Policies. Over recent years, there has been an explosion in the collection of state and local level child and youth indicator data by federal statistical agencies and in the dissemination of those data through agency Web sites. This paper reviews these resources and provides information needed to access the data. Data sources are presented in five topical areas: economics and demographics (e.g., decennial Census and Census 2000 Supplementary Survey); health (vital statistics, disease surveillance systems, and health surveys); education (e.g., Common Core of Data and Schools and Staffing Survey); crime and juvenile justice (e.g., Easy Access System and Census of Juveniles in Residential Placement Databook); and child welfare (National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System and Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System). Each section begins with an overview of what is available, including descriptions of data portholes that agencies have developed to facilitate access to data, and descriptions of individual data resources, including surveys, administrative data sets, and publications available on agency Web sites. Internet addresses to those resources are provided. Selected nonfederal sources are also briefly covered. An appendix presents a summary listing of federal Web sites containing indicator data on children and youth.   [More]  Descriptors: Child Health, Child Welfare, Children, Crime

McDonald, Frances M. (1986). Technology, Privacy, and Electronic Freedom of Speech, Library Trends. Explores five issues related to technology's impact on privacy and access to information–regulation and licensing of the press, electronic surveillance, invasion of privacy, copyright, and policy-making and regulation. The importance of First Amendment rights and civil liberties in forming a coherent national information policy is stressed. Descriptors: Cable Television, Civil Liberties, Copyrights, Electronic Mail

Illinois State Dept. of Public Health, Springfield. (2002). Get the Lead Out: Illinois Childhood Lead Poisoning Surveillance Report, 2001. In order to highlight the importance of identifying children with elevated blood lead levels, the Illinois Department of Public Health produces its surveillance report to present state and county level data on the number of children screened for and identified with lead poisoning. In Illinois, all children between 6 and 84 months of age must be assessed for lead poisoning at least once before entering a licensed day care center, preschool, or kindergarten. Noting that a proposed lower standard for lead poisoning would mean that more than 36 percent of tested children in 2001 were lead-poisoned, this report provides information from 2000 and 2001 on screening tests conducted on children 15 years and younger, with almost all data from children 6 years and younger. The report indicates that 7.3 percent of children had at least 1 blood lead test result greater than or equal to 10 mcg/dL. Children living in high-risk ZIP code areas were more likely to be lead poisoned than children living in low-risk ZIP code areas. African-American and Hispanic children were more likely to be affected by lead poisoning than Caucasian children, with most of the ethnic differences attributed to living in the older housing of high-risk ZIP code areas. Presented in tabular form is information for each Illinois county on the number of children 6 years and under, and 2000 and 2001 information on the number of children tested and the number identified with various blood lead levels; a comparison of Chicago and downstate data is included. Also included in the report is a copy of the Childhood Lead Risk Assessment Questionnaire as well as information on the age at which children should be screened and the importance of screening in high-risk areas. The report concludes with a list of organization sources for information about lead poisoning prevention   [More]  Descriptors: Child Health, Child Safety, Children, Community Characteristics

Coniglio, Susan J.; Blackman, James A. (1995). Developmental Outcome of Childhood Leukemia, Topics in Early Childhood Special Education. Literature on developmental and psychosocial outcomes of childhood leukemia is reviewed, focusing on preschool-age children. Studies are categorized in terms of outcome measures: intelligence/achievement, neuropsychological, memory/attention, and psychosocial tests. Evidence suggests that preschool children with leukemia are at high risk for developmental difficulties. Suggestions are offered for developmental surveillance and educational interventions. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, At Risk Persons, Attention, Cancer

Barrios, Lisa C., Comp. (2000). Federal Activities Addressing Violence in Schools. Special Report. Many federal agencies actively address the problem of violence in schools by acquiring and disseminating information about school violence and supporting strategies that work to reduce violence. This document provides an inventory of federal activities addressing violence in schools. It was designed to facilitate coordination of federal school violence-prevention activities and enhance collaboration on future projects. These activities either directly address the problem of violence that occurs on school property, at school events, or on the way to or from school or they focus on the precursors of violence. After a brief description of each project, study, or organization, the lead or funding agency and the collaborating federal agencies are identified, with contact information also provided. Nonfederal partners are listed in the project descriptions. The reports are divided into categories: surveillance activities, evaluation research activities, other research activities, research synthesis and application activities, programmatic activities, and resource and technical assistance centers.   [More]  Descriptors: Accident Prevention, Elementary Secondary Education, Emergency Programs, Federal Programs

Schneider, Tod (2001). Safer Schools through Environmental Design. ERIC Digest Number 144. This digest describes the key elements of Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED). CPTED is based on the recognition that the physical environment influences human behavior. It is different from conventional security measures, which many times are based on prohibitions, in that it focuses on desired behaviors and attempts to solve problems by changing the physical and social environment and by reinforcing positive behavior. The core elements of CPTED include natural surveillance, in which the whole environment can be viewed; natural access control to determine who can and cannot enter a facility; and territoriality, in which an established control is exerted over the environment. A CPTED analysis of a school evaluates crime rates, office-referral data, school cohesiveness and stability, as well as shortcomings in school design. Naturally, it is more efficient to integrate CPTED during an expansion or new construction, so it is important to integrate CPTED into school planning. When considering a CPTED analysis, school officials should look to professionals for an assessment. These assessments include crime mapping; reports from local police and medical centers; surveys of parents, teachers, and students; inspection of the campus and its surroundings, and an analysis of the surrounding neighborhood.   [More]  Descriptors: Building Design, Educational Environment, Elementary Secondary Education, Environmental Influences

Lasky, Sue; Moore, Shawn (2000). Closing Emotional Distance: An Analysis of Parent-Teacher Interactions in Secondary Schools. This paper explores the ways in which the culture and organization of teaching influences the experiences and emotions secondary teachers report in their interactions with parents. Hargreaves' (1998) framework, based on the emotional politics of teaching, is modified and applied to the analysis of 68 secondary teacher interview responses from 2 studies that took place in 1997 and 1999 in Ontario, Canada. Four themes that emerged in the data were examined: (1) the prevalence of interaction rather than relationship between secondary teachers and parents; (2) teachers' sense of moral purpose and notions of caring that influence how they interact with parents and interpret these interactions; (3) mutual surveillance between parents and teachers; and (4) notions of teacher professionalism as they shape teacher-parent interactions. Findings indicate that parent-teacher contracts are typically episodic, school-based, and rule-bound. The paper closes with questions and suggestions for further research. (Contains 94 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Interpersonal Relationship, Parent Teacher Cooperation, Parents

Schneider, Tod (2001). Colegios mas seguros a traves del diseno del medioambiente (Safer Schools through Environmental Design). ERIC Digest. This digest in Spanish describes the key elements of Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED). CPTED is based on the recognition that the physical environment influences human behavior. It is different from conventional security measures, which many times are based on prohibitions, in that it focuses on desired behaviors and attempts to solve problems by changing the physical and social environment and by reinforcing positive behavior. The core elements of CPTED include natural surveillance, in which the whole environment can be viewed; natural access control to determine who can and cannot enter a facility; and territoriality, in which an established control is exerted over the environment. A CPTED analysis of a school evaluates crime rates, office-referral data, school cohesiveness and stability, as well as shortcomings in school design. Naturally, it is more efficient to integrate CPTED during an expansion or new construction, so it is important to integrate CPTED into school planning. When considering a CPTED analysis, school officials should look to professionals for an assessment. These assessments include crime mapping; reports from local police and medical centers; surveys of parents, teachers, and students; inspection of the campus and its surroundings, and an analysis of the surrounding neighborhood.   [More]  Descriptors: Building Design, Educational Environment, Elementary Secondary Education, Environmental Influences

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