Bibliography: Surveillance Education (page 64 of 81)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized for the Whistleblower Defense website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Suzanne Wesson, Catherine M. Wehlburg, Christopher Botsko, Mary W. Green, Barbara Allen Carr, Shelli Stewart, Troy L. Armstrong, Leslie L. Randall, Doris Layton MacKenzie, and David M. Altschuler.

Miller, J. A.; And Others (1972). Instrumental Surveillance of Water Quality. The role analytical instrumentation performs in the surveillance and control of the quality of water resources is reviewed. Commonly performed analyses may range from simple tests for physical parameters to more highly sophisticated radiological or spectrophotometric methods. This publication explores many of these types of water quality analyses and can serve as a guide for selecting the most appropriate instrumentation for a given water analysis. Areas covered include: oxygen measurements, biological oxygen demand, pH measurement, Selection electrode measurements, atomic absorption, nuclear techniques, ultraviolet spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and gas chromatography. The required instrumentation is described and sample analyses are offered to illustrate specific water quality application. Descriptors: Comparative Analysis, Environment, Instrumentation, Measurement Instruments

Burbules, Nicholas C.; Callister, Thomas A., Jr. (2000). Watch IT: The Risks and Promises of Information Technologies for Education. This book is an examination of several critical issues and controversies concerning the potential of new information technology (IT) for education. In a series of interrelated essays, the book explores such issues as access, credibility, new approaches to reading and writing, the glut of information, privacy, censorship, commercialization, and online community. Chapters are as follows: "The Risky Promises and Promising Risks of New Information Technologies for Education"; "Dilemmas of Access and Credibility: Access for Whom? Access to What?"; "Hypertext: Knowledge at the Crossroads"; "Critically Reading the Internet"; "Misinformation, Malinformation, Messed-Up Information, and Mostly Useless Information: Is Censorship the Best Response?"; "Surveillance and Privacy: Can Technology Protect What Technology Takes Away?""Information for Sale: Commercialization and the Educational Potential of the Internet"; and "What Kind of Community Can the Internet Be?" Includes an index. Descriptors: Access to Information, Censorship, Computer Assisted Instruction, Computer Uses in Education

Brown, Brett V.; Botsko, Christopher (1996). A Guide to State and Local-Level Indicators of Child Well-Being Available through the Federal Statistical System. Over the last several years there has been a steadily growing interest in the availability of data that can be used to track the well-being of children, largely due to national and state Kids Count projects. This report reviews 15 federal data sources from which child indicators can be assessed and tracked over time for many states and localities. The data sources are: Current Population Surveys (CPS); Decennial Census; American Housing Survey (AHS); National Assessment of Educational Programs (NAEP); Common Core of Data (CCD); Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS); Vital Statistics System; Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS); Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (RFFSS); National Immunization Survey (NIS); National Health Interview Survey (NHIS); Sexually Transmitted Diseases Surveillance System (STD); Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring system (RPRAMS); Uniform Crime Reports (UCR); and National Crime Victimization Survey (NCNS). The review of each data source includes the following: (1) basic description of the source; (2) listing of states and localities covered; (3) significant limitations of the data; (4) listing of child well-being indicators that are produced or can be produced; (5) major publications that report state and local child indicator data from the data source; (6) description of publicly available databases from which indicators can be assessed through original analyses; (7) listing of offices that produce custom analyses of the data; and (8) listing of contact persons for publications, data purchases, and further information. In addition, the report includes appendices which list state contacts who can provide the desired information or data well before the responsible federal agency, and a quick-reference table that summarizes the child well-being measures and geographic coverage across the 15 data sources, organized by topic area.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Birth Weight, Census Figures, Child Abuse

Altschuler, David M.; Armstrong, Troy L.; MacKenzie, Doris Layton (1999). Reintegration, Supervised Release, and Intensive Aftercare. Juvenile Justice Bulletin. Interest in the issue of aftercare for juvenile offenders continues to grow. Jurisdictions seek new ways to reintegrate youth being released from confinement back into their communities, while also ensuring for public safety. Juvenile justice policymakers and professionals are experimenting with aftercare and other reintegration models. After long-term, multistage research and development initiatives to design an intensive model, the Intensive Aftercare Program Model (IAP) was created. This publication describes the intensive juvenile aftercare model and compares it with other approaches. It offers an analysis of other programs with the goal of helping to determine what does and does not work in reintegrating juvenile offenders into their communities. The study suggests that some combination of treatment methods, with or without surveillance in the community, is effective in reducing the recidivism of juveniles. (Contains 71 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Adolescents, Correctional Rehabilitation, Delinquency, Juvenile Justice

Illinois State Dept. of Public Health, Springfield. (2000). Get the Lead Out: Illinois Childhood Lead Poisoning Surveillance Report, 1999. In order to highlight the importance of identifying children with elevated blood lead levels, the Illinois Department of Public Health produces its surveillance report to present state and county level data on the number of children screened for and identified with lead poisoning. In Illinois, all children between 6 and 84 months of age must be assessed for lead poisoning at least once before entering a licensed day care center, preschool, or kindergarten. This report provides information from 1998 and 1999 on screening tests conducted on children 15 years old or younger. The report indicates that in 1999, 11 percent of those tested had at least 1 blood lead test result greater than or equal to 10 mcg/dL. African American children are over three times more likely to be affected by lead poisoning than Caucasian children. Hispanic children were nearly twice as likely to have lead poisoning as Caucasian children. Much of the group differences were attributed to the fact that minority groups were more likely to live in older housing in high-risk areas. The age at which children should be screened is discussed, and requirements for screening children living in high-risk areas is presented. The report concludes with a list of organizational sources for information about lead poisoning prevention.   [More]  Descriptors: Blacks, Child Health, Children, Community Characteristics

Hennessey, Beth A.; Amabile, Teresa M. (1987). Creativity and Learning: What Research Says to the Teacher. The pamphlet reviews research on creativity and applies it to the learning process. After discussing the definition and measurement of creativity, the components of creative performance are outlined, including domain-relevant skills, creativity-relevant skills, and intrinsic task motivation. Factors which destroy students' creativity are noted, such as having children work for an expected reward, setting up competitive situations, having children focus on expected evaluation, using plenty of surveillance, and setting up restricted-choice situations. Strategies for nurturing and encouraging intrinsic motivation and creativity in classroom settings are explored. A bibliography and a list of resources on thinking skills conclude the pamphlet.   [More]  Descriptors: Creative Development, Creative Thinking, Creativity, Creativity Research

Stewart, Shelli, Ed. (2000). WY KIDS COUNT in Wyoming Factbook, 2000: A County-by-County Factbook. This KIDS COUNT factbook details statewide trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. Following an overview of key indicators and data sources, the factbook documents trends by county for 23 indicators: (1) child and youth population; (2) births; (3) low birth-weight babies; (4) early prenatal care; (5) infants deaths; (6) child deaths; (7) births to unmarried mothers of all ages; (8) births to mothers who smokes during pregnancy; (9) teen births; (10) children affected by divorce; (11) juvenile crime arrests; (12) teen violent deaths; (13) teen motor vehicle related deaths; (14) teen suicide; (15) education; (16) average daily membership in schools; (17) drop out incidences; (18) 1999 youth risk behavior surveillance; (19) infants, toddlers, and preschoolers with developmental disabilities; (20) licensed child care facilities; (21) poverty; (22) welfare reform; and (23) child health care. The findings indicate declining trends in child population, high school dropouts, children in families receiving welfare, births, early prenatal care, teen birth rate, juvenile violent crime arrests, and the number of licensed day care facilities. Increasing trends are noted for the number of children in poverty, infant deaths and infant mortality, low birthweight babies, babies born to unwed mothers, mothers who smoked during pregnancy, overall juvenile crime arrests, and the number of children with developmental disabilities.   [More]  Descriptors: Adolescents, Birth Weight, Births to Single Women, Child Health

Wehlburg, Catherine M., Ed.; Chadwick-Blossey, Sandra, Ed. (2004). To Improve the Academy: Resources for Faculty, Instructional, and Organizational Development, Volume 22. An annual publication, "To Improve the Academy" offers a resource for improvement in higher education to faculty, instructional development staff, and administrators. The chapters of part 1, "Past, Present, and Future of SoTL," contains: (1) "The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Past Lessons, Current Challenges, and Future Visions" (Kathleen McKinney)). Part 2, "Assessment and Faculty Development," contains: (2) "Triangulating Faculty Needs for the Assessment of Student Learning" (D. Lynn Sorenson and Timothy W. Bothell); (3) "Documenting the Educational Innovations of Faculty: A Win-Win situation for Faculty and the Faculty Development Center" (Phyllis Blumberg); (4) "Evaluating the Return on Investment of Faculty Development" (Timothy W. Bothell and Tom Henderson); and (5)"Beyond Bean Counting: Making Faculty Development Needs Assessment More Meaningful" (Pamela M. Milloy and Corly Brooke). Section 3, "Curriculum Design and Evaluation," contains: (6) "Color-Coded Course Design: Educating and Engaging Faculty To Educate and Engage Students" (Marlene M. Preston); (7) "From SGID and GIFT to BBQ: Streamlining Midterm Student Evaluations To Improve Teaching and Learning" (Margaret K. Snooks, Sue E. Neeley, and Kathleen M. Williamson); and (8) "A Versatile Interactive Focus Group Protocol for Qualitative Assessments" (Barbara J. Millis). Section 4, "Faculty Development Tools," contains: (9) "A Transformative Model for Designing Professional Development Activities" (David J. Langley, Terence W. O'Connor, and Michele M. Welkener); (10) "A Systematic, Hands-On, Reflective, and Effective (SHORE) Approach to Faculty Development for New and Seasoned Faculty" (Scott E. Hampton, Craig D. Morrow, Ashleah Bechtel, and Marjorie H. Carroll); (11) "Foucault and the Practice of Educational Development: Power and Surveillance in Individual Consultations" (Peter Felten, Deandra Little, and Allison Pingree); (12) "Approaching Faculty Development Support from the Grassroots: Establishment of an Innovative, Formal, Untenured Faculty Organization" (Ellen N. Junn, Ellen Kottler, Jacqueline K. Coffman, Pamella H. Oliver, and Fred Ramirez); (13) "Fostering Diversity in a Faculty Development Organization" (Matthew L. Ouellett and Christine A. Stanley); and (14) "Playing Well with Others: Academic Development as a Team Sport" (Nancy Van Note Chisom). Section 5,"Student Learning and Faculty Development," contains: (15) "Problem-Based Service Learning: Rewards and Challenges with Undergraduates" (Kenneth France); (16) "Effective Peer Evaluation in Learning Teams" (Debbie Williams, Doug Foster, Bo Green, Paul Lakey, Raye Lackey, Fay Mills, and Carol Williams); (17) "An International Perspective on Assessing Group Projects" (Deborah Willis and Barbara J. Millis); and (18) "The Hesburgh Certificate and Portland State University's Faculty Development Approach to Supporting Service Learning and Community-University Partnerships" (Kevin Kecskes, Amy Spring, and Devorah Lieberman). Section 6, "Faculty Development with Part-Time Instructors," contains; (19) "Making Adjunct Faculty Part of the Academic Community" (Karen Krupar); and (20) "Graduate Student Mentors: Meeting the Challenges of the Ongoing Development of Graduate Student Instructors" (Chris O'Neal and Jennifer Karlin). (Contains 282 references.) Descriptors: College Faculty, Educational Improvement, Higher Education, Organizational Development

Green, Mary W. (1999). The Appropriate and Effective Use of Security Technologies in U.S. Schools. A Guide for Schools and Law Enforcement Agencies. This guide provides basic guidelines to help schools, in collaboration with law enforcement agencies, analyze their vulnerability to violence, theft, and vandalism, and suggest possible technologies to effectively address these problems. It describes existing commercially available technologies and urges thoughtful consideration of not only the potential safety benefits that may accrue from their use but also the costs that schools may incur for capital investments, site modifications, additional staffing, training, and equipment maintenance and repair. Topic areas include security concepts and operational issues, video surveillance, weapons detection devices (walk-through and handheld metal detectors and x-ray baggage scanners), entry controls, and duress alarms. Resource information including books, publications, web sites, and conferences conclude the guide.   [More]  Descriptors: Crime Prevention, Elementary Secondary Education, Guidelines, Public Schools

MMWR: Morbidity and Morality Weekly Report (2000). Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance–United States, 1999. CDC Surveillance Summaries. In the United States, approximately three-fourths of all deaths among persons aged 10-24 years result from only four causes: motor-vehicle crashes, other unintentional injuries, homicide, and suicide. Results from this 1999 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey demonstrate that numerous high school students engage in behaviors that increase the likelihood of their death from these four causes. During the 30 days preceding the survey, 16.4% had rarely or never worn a seat belt; 33.1% had ridden with a driver who had been drinking alcohol; 17.3% had carried a weapon; 50.0% had drunk alcohol; 26.7% had used marijuana; and during the 12 months preceding the survey 7.8% had attempted suicide. Substantial morbidity and social problems among young persons also result from unintended pregnancies and STDs, including HIV infection. Two-thirds of all deaths among persons under 25 years of age result from only 2 causes–cardiovascular disease and cancer. The majority of risk behaviors associated with these two causes of death are initiated during adolescence. Results from this study can be utilized by health and education officials to analyze and improve policies and programs that reduce health-risk behaviors among youth. (Contains 43 tables and 11 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Adolescents, At Risk Persons, Death, Drinking

Randall, Leslie L.; Krogh, Christopher; Welty, Thomas K.; Willinger, Marian; Iyasu, Solomon (2001). The Aberdeen Indian Health Service Infant Mortality Study: Design, Methodology, and Implementation, American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research: The Journal of the National Center. Of all Indian Health Service areas, the Aberdeen Area has consistently had the highest infant mortality rate. Among some tribes in this area the rate has exceeded 30/1000 live birth and half the infant deaths have been attributed to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, a rate four to five times higher than the national average. The Indian Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and the Aberdeen Area Tribal Chairmen's Health Board collaborated to investigate these high rates with the goals of refining the ascertainment of the causes of death, improving cause-specific infant mortality rates and identifying factors contributing to the high rates. Ten of the 19 tribes or tribal communities, representing 66% of the area population, participated in a 4-year prospective case-control study of infants who died after discharge from the hospital. Infant care practices and socio-demographic, economic, medical, health care, and environmental factors were examined. The study included parental interviews, death scene investigations, autopsies, neuropathology studies, medical chart abstractions, blood cotinine assays, and a surveillance system for infant deaths. Controls were the previous and subsequent infants born on the case mother's reservation. From December 1, 1992 until November 30, 1996, 72 infant deaths were investigated. This report describes the study methods and the model employed for involving the community and multiple agencies to study the problem of infant mortality among Northern Plains Indians. Data gathered during the investigations are being analyzed and will be published at a later date. The following is appended: (1) Reduction of Infant Mortality Recommendations for Parents. [This study is also supported by the Centers of Disease Prevention and Control (CDC) and the Tribal Chairmen's Health Board (AATCHB).]   [More]  Descriptors: American Indians, Prevention, Mortality Rate, Child Health

Herrera, Sandra; Holland, Lana; Wesson, Suzanne (2000). School Safety and Violence. School districts in the Education Service Center, Region 2, (southern Texas) were surveyed to examine procedures the districts have put in place to identify threats of violence to school safety and security. The target population was 47 school districts. Data collection was done using mailed questionnaires with a simple yes/no answer format. Twenty-eight schools completed and returned questionnaires. Data are presented in a narrative, tabular format. Survey results show that planning is of the utmost importance and must include every level of community. Communication among all parties involved is vital to carrying out plans and keeping chaos and stress to a minimum. Proactive measures include a variety of surveillance programs, standardized dress, closed-campus policies, and anger management and conflict resolution in curricula. Recommendations include doing a replicate study using a larger population, establishing a lobby to promote and seek school-safety legislation, and placing greater emphasis on educating future school personnel about school violence at the university level. The report concludes with 45 references and 4 appendices containing a list of principles to help avoid misinterpretation of early warning signs of violence, a list of early warning signs, letters and forms for permission to survey and perform the follow-up study, and the survey questionnaire.   [More]  Descriptors: Conflict Resolution, Crisis Management, Dress Codes, Elementary Secondary Education

Illinois State Dept. of Public Health, Springfield. (2001). Get the Lead Out: Illinois Childhood Lead Poisoning Surveillance Report, 2000. In order to highlight the importance of identifying children with elevated blood lead levels, the Illinois Department of Public Health produces its surveillance report to present state and county level data on the number of children screened for and identified with lead poisoning. In Illinois, all children between 6 and 84 months of age must be assessed for lead poisoning at least once before entering a licensed day care center, preschool, or kindergarten. This report provides information from 1999 and 2000 on screening tests conducted on children 15 years old or younger. The report indicates that in 2000, 9 percent of those tested had at least 1 blood lead test result greater than or equal to 10 mcg/dL. African American children continue to be over three times more likely to be affected by lead poisoning than Caucasian children. Hispanic children continue to be nearly twice as likely as Caucasian children to have lead poisoning. Much of the group differences are attributed to the fact that minority groups were more likely to live in older housing in high-risk areas. The age at which children should be screened is discussed in the report, and requirements for screening children living in high-risk areas is presented. Presented in tabular form is information for each Illinois county on the number of children 6 years and under, and 1999 and 2000 information on the number of children tested and the number identified with various blood lead levels. The report concludes with a list of organizational sources for information about lead poisoning prevention.    [More]  Descriptors: Child Health, Child Safety, Children, Community Characteristics

Department of Education and Science, Dublin (Ireland). (1998). Maintenance Matters: Maintenance and Minor Works in Primary Schools. A Manual for Boards of Management. This manual provides guidance in the maintenance requirements of primary education schools in Ireland, covering: roofing; floors and walls; doors and windows; external and internal finishes; heating, plumbing, and drainage; electrical installations; paved and grassed surfaces; and furniture and loose equipment. The basic considerations are covered for each area followed by a list of the types of problems encountered, why these problems arise, and tips for maintenance surveillance. Also included is advice on work planning covering applications, appointing consultants and contractors, and key points on health and safety regulations. An appendix contains grant regulations for minor works to national schools, and maintenance checklist sample forms.   [More]  Descriptors: Elementary Education, Elementary Schools, Foreign Countries, Guidelines

Carr, Barbara Allen (2000). Behind the Fences: Case Study of a Literacy Teacher in a Prison Classroom. A study of the experiences of a literacy teacher in the prison classroom chronicled the daily routine events and experiences that make up the life world of a teacher in the prison classroom. The introduction of this study emerged through the technique called opportunistic surveillance. The researcher, a prison teacher, engaged in behavior-monitoring procedures to search the environment for opportunities not activated by a problem and examined why another teacher, Garnet, made the choice to enter the prison system as a teacher. The researcher determined Garnet was in middle adulthood and had reached the turning point in her career that propelled her to seek renewal rather than complacency. She exhibited satisfaction and flexibility with her work, yet sought creative ways to teach that would benefit her students. Garnet flourished as a teacher and her students made progress. To create a knowledgeable audience, the researcher tried to define the teacher's world through its chief components–teacher, organizational factors, instructional support factors, and students–and used them as themes as she engaged in the constant comparisons strategy. The process involved a complex, somewhat chaotic pattern of interviewing, reading the literature, writing, member checking, and peer review. (Contains 30 references.)   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Basic Education, Case Studies, Correctional Education, Correctional Institutions

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