Bibliography: Surveillance Education (page 67 of 81)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized for the Whistleblower Defense website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Ethel M. Wilcox, Indianapolis National Collegiate Athletic Association, Alan E. Gross, Andrew M. Pope, Atlanta Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (DHHS/CDC), ROBERT L. EGBERT, JOHN F. COGSWELL, William Watson Purkey, Cornelius I. Weber, and Washington Environmental Protection Agency.

Benjamin, Louise M. (1982). Privacy Protection and Two-Way Cable Television: Report and Recommendations. Arguing that the threat to privacy in the new technological era of information processing and transmitting via cable television is a real one, this paper proposes that the threat can be minimized through effective legislation. The paper first looks at cable television privacy concerns and examines several studies concerning privacy, then reviews existing federal laws and court decisions concerning privacy in three areas applicable to two-way cable: (1) data gathering, storage, and dissemination; (2) disclosure of records held by third parties; and (3) eavesdropping or electronic surveillance. The paper also considers current state cable regulations and cable company self-regulatory practices regarding privacy. It then applies these studies, laws, and practices to formulating recommendations for future cable privacy legislation. The paper concludes with a list of 11 such recommendations that provide a guide for protecting cable subscribers' privacy.   [More]  Descriptors: Cable Television, Civil Liberties, Federal Legislation, Legal Problems

Purkey, William Watson (1999). Creating Safe Schools through Invitational Education. ERIC Digest. The National Center for Educational Statistics 1998 Report stated that one in ten schools in their sample reported at least one violent crime over the past year. To promote school safety, educators have used traditional law enforcement methods that rely heavily on surveillance, penalties, and punishment. These methods applied to schools can be effective but they carry major negative side effects, including a large financial burden. This digest represents an alternative approach to creating and maintaining safe schools. The approach, known as Invitational Education, provides a framework for making schools more exciting, satisfying, and enriching. Invitational Education centers on four guiding principles of respect, trust, optimism, and intentionality. The Five P's of the concept, people, places, policies, programs, and processes, provide the means to address the global nature and symbolic structure of schools. It expands the education process by applying steady and continuous pressure from a number of points. Rather than relying on one program, one policy, or one process, Invitational Learning addresses the total spirit within a school. It is concerned with more than grades, attendance, academic achievement, discipline, and test scores. It is concerned with the skills of becoming a decent and productive citizen in a democratic society.   [More]  Descriptors: Crime Prevention, Elementary Secondary Education, Prevention, School Safety

Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (DHHS/CDC), Atlanta, GA. (1999). Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs, August 1999. This publication presents best practices to help states assess options for comprehensive tobacco control programs and to evaluate their local funding priorities. It draws on best practices determined by evidence-based analyses of excise tax-funded tobacco control programs in California and Massachusetts and by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's involvement in providing technical assistance in the planning of comprehensive tobacco control programs in other states with excise tax-funded programs (Oregon and Maine) and in the four states that individually settled lawsuits with tobacco companies (Florida, Minnesota, Mississippi, and Texas). Section A, "Components of Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs," focuses on (1) "Community Programs to Reduce Tobacco Use," (2)"Chronic Disease Programs to Reduce the Burden of Tobacco-Related Diseases," (3) "School Programs," (4) "Enforcement," (5) "Statewide Programs," (6) "Counter-Marketing, " (7) "Cessation Programs," (8) "Surveillance and Evaluation," and (9) "Administration and Management." Section B presents "Funding Model for All 50 States." Section C offers "Recommended Program Element Budgets, by State." An appendix presents information on the efficacy of comprehensive tobacco control programs in California and Massachusetts.   [More]  Descriptors: Community Education, Comprehensive School Health Education, Elementary Secondary Education, Financial Support

COGSWELL, JOHN F.; EGBERT, ROBERT L. (1964). SYSTEM DESIGN FOR A CONTINUOUS PROGRESS SCHOOL–PART II, SURVEILLANCE AND DETECTION SYSTEM. THE DESIGN OF A SURVEILLANCE AND DETECTION SYSTEM WAS PRESENTED FOR APPLICATION TO THE CONTINUOUS PROGRESS SCHOOL, DEVELOPED BY DR. EDWIN READ OF BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY. THE PURPOSE OF THIS SYSTEM, PART OF AN INFORMATION PROCESSING CENTER, WAS (1) TO MONITOR AND SURVEY THE STUDY ACTIVITIES OF STUDENTS, (2) TO DETECT THE PRESENCE OF REAL AND IMMINENT PROBLEMS IN STUDENT PERFORMANCES, AND (3) TO ALERT APPROPRIATE PERSONNEL FOR ACTION. THE SYSTEM WOULD FOLLOW UP ON STUDENT PERFORMANCE OF ASSIGNED TASKS, CONDUCT PERIODIC REVIEWS OF STUDENT PERFORMANCE TO COMPARE ACTUAL PERFORMANCE WITH THAT EXPECTED, AND DETERMINE THE PERSON TO BE ALERTED IN THE EVENT OF TROUBLE. FLOW DIAGRAMS OF THE SYSTEM WERE INCLUDED IN THE REPORT. RELATED REPORTS ARE ED 010 561, ED 010 563, AND ED 010 564.    [More]  Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Continuous Progress Plan, Experimental Curriculum, Experimental Programs

Centers for Disease Control (DHHS/PHS), Atlanta, GA. (1983). Report of the Health Education-Risk Reduction Conference (Anaheim, California, October 27-30, 1981). This report reviews, recounts, and assesses the accomplishments and progress made to date by many public health professionals engaged collectively in a nationwide health education-risk reduction program. Papers are presented outlining progress by health agencies, working alone or in collaboration, whose basic goals were: (1) inventory of statewide resources for health education-risk reduction; (2) establishment of working relationships with other agencies; (3) determining risk factor prevalence by State; (4) identifying surveillance systems for chronic disease morbidity and mortality data; and (5) pursuing an organized approach to risk reduction. These have proved effective for stimulating new networks, new interventions, and new thinking for addressing the preventable health problems of the 1980's and 1990's. The local education intervention projects described are demonstrating the effectiveness of a planned community approach to risk reduction.   [More]  Descriptors: Cooperative Planning, Drug Abuse, Government Role, Health Education

Weber, Cornelius I. (1971). A Guide to the Common Diatoms at Water Pollution Surveillance System Stations. This guide was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a taxonomic reference for the identification of diatoms. The taxonomic information included consists of a generic key to the common genera of diatoms, a section illustrating 164 diatom species representing 43 common genera found at the Water Pollution Surveillance System (WPSS) stations, and an alphabetical list of the genera included in this publication. Related information includes collection and slide preparation procedures, a description of the structure of the diatom cell wall, and a glossary of terms used in diatom taxonomy. Also included is a map of the WPSS station locations in the United States and charts indicating the four most abundant diatom species at these WPSS stations. No information is given on the ecology of diatoms. Descriptors: Biology, Classification, Environment, Instructional Materials

Wilcox, Ethel M.; And Others (1983). Conflict on the Nursing Staff: A Case for Overload Studies. To discover the kinds of conflict encountered by hospital nursing staff members, nurses from several hospitals were asked to report the types of conflict they anticipated meeting during a work week. The answers were categorized into eight loci of conflict topics: (1) physician-nurse conflict, (2) uncooperative working norms, (3) superior-subordinate communication style, (4) fairness in staff assignments, (5) difficult patients, (6) performance surveillance by superiors, (7) communication with other departments, and (8) communication of new policies and procedures. The findings suggest that nursing staff conflict might be an organizational communication problem rather than an interpersonal dysfunction. Hospitals wishing to ameliorate some of the causes of staff conflict might consider establishing lateral and horizontal communication lines within the orgnization, forming task forces with specific assignments among the nursing staff, initiating simulations of resource demands, and restructuring around the information processing capabilities of the organization members. Descriptors: Communication Problems, Communication Research, Conflict, Health Personnel

Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Toxic Substances. (1988). Asbestos-in-Schools: A Guide to New Federal Requirements for Local Education Agencies. In 1986, the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) was signed into law requiring the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop regulations which provide a comprehensive framework for addressing asbestos problems in secondary and elementary schools. The new rule, The Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools Rule, requires all public, private, elementary and secondary schools to inspect for friable and nonfriable asbestos, develop management plans, and implement response actions in a timely fashion. This guide provides practical information to help local education agencies meet the requirements of the new rule. Discussions in this guide include: (1) the major elements of the rule; (2) the appointment of a designated person; (3) the use of accredited persons; (4) initial inspections; (5) developing management plans; (6) implementing response actions; (7) periodic reinspections and surveillance; (8) training and awareness; (9) record keeping; and (10) rule compliance. Appendices include: "EPA-funded Training Programs"; "Regional Asbestos Coordinators"; "AHERA State Designated Contracts"; and a sample inspection form.   [More]  Descriptors: Asbestos, Compliance (Legal), Elementary Secondary Education, Environmental Education

Stokrocki, Mary (1991). Problems in Interpreting Meaning in Multicultural Settings; Authority in Art Education. This articles explores authoritive problems in interpreting art education in research, namely authorization and authorship. Authorization rites and rights are now under institutional surveillance. A researcher should proceed with ethical fairness. The process of authorship is one of the negotiation of conflicting meanings, and at times subject to "overinterpretation" due to differences in theoretical traditions. Authority is rarely singular, especially after editorial review, and is actually a collective voice of experts and participants. In building an argument, a researcher can rely on different levels of authority: personal experience and expert opinion, dialogous consensus, and a polyphonic or triangulated interpretation. The latter types become more significant for a postmodern world. Authority, therefore, is a shared experience and responsibility.   [More]  Descriptors: Art Education, Cultural Awareness, Data Interpretation, Ethics

Turchen, Dick (1972). Television for Surveillance: An Overview, Educational and Industrial Television. A description of some of the recent technological advances and how they help in security CCTV." Descriptors: Closed Circuit Television, Crime, Equipment Utilization, Security

Symes, Colin, Ed.; Meadmore, Daphne, Ed. (1999). The Extra-Ordinary School: Parergonality & Pedagogy. Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education. This text examines various features in the school culture and argues that the "extraordinary" represents an important dimension in the way a school is maintained and managed. It discusses various aspects of culture such as vestibules, speech night, school excursions, and festivities and looks at aspects of school administration from the perspective of school time, school efficiency drives, and testing. The book contains 12 articles: "Parergonality and Pedagogy," Colin Symes and Daphne Meadmore; "First Impressions: The Semiotics of School Vestibules," Colin Symes; "'Securing a Regular Government': The Prefect and the Contemporary School," Erica McWilliam and Nicole Cantle; "All-Male Schooling: Speech Night and the Construction of Masculinities," Richard Courtice; "New Routes for the Field Trip," Gordon Tait and Deborah Huber; "Brand New Spectacles: The Make-Over of the School Musical," Erica McWilliam; "Un/Learning the Habits of Clock Time: Re-Vision Time for Time in Education," Barbara Adam; "Efficiency at Any Cost: The Post-Welfarist Education Policy Context," Sharon Gewirtz; "Keeping up to the Mark: Testing as Surveillance," Daphne Meadmore; "Health, the Body and the Medicalisation of the School," David Kirk; "Embodying the School/Schooling Bodies: Physical Education as Disciplinary Technology," David Kirk; and "Schoolies Week: Rethinking Risk," Susan Hopkins. Descriptors: Classroom Environment, Educational Environment, Educational Theories, Elementary Secondary Education

National Collegiate Athletic Association, Indianapolis, IN. (1999). NCAA Sports Medicine Handbook, 1999-2000. Twelfth Edition. This handbook, first published in 1975, is the primary educational tool used by the National Collegiate Athletic Association Committee on Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports, and is designed to assist schools in the development of safe intercollegiate athletics programs. The handbook's first section on administrative issues covers sports medicine administration; medical evaluations, immunizations, and records; dispensing prescription medication; and lightning safety. The second section dealing with medical issues covers medical disqualification of the student-athlete; skin infections in wrestling; prevention of heat illness; weight loss/hypohydration; assessment of body composition; eating disorders/anorexia and bulimia; menstrual cycle dysfunction; blood borne pathogens; nontherapeutic drugs; nutritional ergogenic aids; use of local anesthetics; use of injectable corticosteroids for sports injuries; cold stress; "burners," or brachial plexus injuries; and concussion and second-impact syndrome. The third section on special populations covers participation by impaired and pregnant student-athletes and student-athletes with sickle cell trait. The final section on equipment covers protective equipment; eye safety; use of the trampoline and minitramp; mouth guards; use of the head as a weapon in football and other contact sports; and guidelines for fitting and removing helmets. Appended is a NCAA injury surveillance system summary.   [More]  Descriptors: Accessibility (for Disabled), Administrator Guides, College Athletics, Disabilities

Gross, Alan E.; And Others (1974). Persuasion, Surveillance, and Voting Behavior, Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. The present study was designed to test the efficacy of two basic strategies which might be employed to increase the probability that a potential voter will act in accordance with his presumed belief that it is right, good, or desirable to exercise his franchise. Descriptors: Data Collection, Followup Studies, Group Norms, Letters (Correspondence)

Rogers, Robert H. (1977). Application of LANDSAT to the Surveillance of Lake Eutrophication in the Great Lakes Basin. Final Report. This document reviews the process by which the cost benefits of using LANDSAT on an operational basis in the surveillance of lake eutrophication was established. The program identified the information needs of users conducting on-going water quality programs, transformed these needs into remote sensing requirements, produced LANDSAT maps and data graphics responsive to the requirements, and compared the information and cost achieved by LANDSAT with those obtained from other data sources. The study was used to support the EPA's study of lake eutrophication in Saginaw Bay, Michigan and the State of Wisconsin's lake and watershed studies. The significant results of the program included the demonstration of cost-effective systems for monitoring: (1) trophic state of areas/scenes containing 200 or more lakes of 50 acres or larger; (2) trophic state of the Great Lakes; and (3) watershed land use required to predict pollutants in runoff. Descriptors: Computer Oriented Programs, Ecological Factors, Ecology, Environmental Influences

Pope, Andrew M., Ed.; Tarlov, Alvin R., Ed. (1991). Disability in America: Toward a National Agenda for Prevention. Summary and Recommendations. This pamphlet reprints the preface, contents, executive summary, and 27 recommendations from an extensive report on disability prevention issued by the Committee on a National Agenda for the Prevention of Disabilities. The summary notes that disability is a social, public health, and moral issue in addition to a medical issue. It cites statistics on the incidence of disabling conditions, and offers an overview of the conceptual framework of disability used in the report, composed of pathology, impairment, functional limitation, and disability. The summary then discusses prevention of disabilities across the life cycle: developmental disabilities, injury-related disabilities, disabilities associated with chronic disease and aging, and secondary conditions associated with disability. The 27 recommendations deal with the areas of: organization and coordination of a national program for the prevention of disability, surveillance, research, access to care and preventive services, and professional and public education.   [More]  Descriptors: Accessibility (for Disabled), Aging (Individuals), Chronic Illness, Developmental Disabilities

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