Bibliography: Surveillance Education (page 75 of 81)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized for the Whistleblower Defense website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education. Ohio State Univ, Stuart H. Surlin, Washington National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Eugene A. Kroupa, Arleen S. Barron, Arnold H. Ismach, JAMES GILBERT PALTRIDGE, Claron Burnett, Charles W. Hall, and Robert L. Stevenson.

PALTRIDGE, JAMES GILBERT (1966). CALIFORNIA'S COORDINATING COUNCIL FOR HIGHER EDUCATION. A STUDY OF ORGANIZATIONAL GROWTH AND CHANGE. THE COORDINATING COUNCIL FOR HIGHER EDUCATION WAS ORGANIZED IN 1960 UNDER PROVISIONS OF THE STATE'S MASTER PLAN FOR HIGHER EDUCATION. OBSERVATION, INTERVIEWS, AND ANALYSIS OF WRITTEN MATERIALS PROVIDE THE BASIS FOR THIS REPORT ON CHANGES IN THE COUNCIL'S PROCEDURES, MEMBERSHIP, AND AUTHORITY. THE ORIGINAL MEMBERSHIP INCLUDED THREE REPRESENTATIVES FROM EACH SEGMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION (STATE UNIVERSITY, STATE COLLEGES, JUNIOR COLLEGES, AND PRIVATE INSTITUTIONS). ADDITION OF SIX LAY MEMBERS HAS INCREASED THE TOTAL MEMBERSHIP TO 18, OF WHOM NINE ARE REPRESENTATIVES OF PUBLIC HIGHER EDUCATION. AMONG ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGES HAVE BEEN 1) A MOVE TO THE STATE CAPITAL, 2) ELIMINATION OF PROXY VOTING AND RESTRICTION OF ALTERNATE MEMBERSHIPS, AND 3) CHANGES IN TERMS AND MANNER OF APPOINTMENT OF MEMBERS. THE COUNCIL'S ACTIVITIES HAVE MOVED TOWARD 1) ACTIVE, RATHER THAN PASSIVE, SURVEILLANCE OF THE DIFFERENTIATED FUNCTIONS OF THE PUBLIC HIGHER EDUCATION SEGMENTS, 2) INCREASINGLY ACTIVE RELATIONSHIP WITH THE STATE GOVERNMENT, AND 3) STATE LEVEL ADMINISTRATION OF SEVERAL FEDERAL PROGRAMS IN AID TO HIGHER EDUCATION. (CAUSES AND EFFECTS OF THESE CHANGES ARE DISCUSSED, AS ARE TOPICS SUGGESTED FOR FURTHER RESEARCH.)   [More]  Descriptors: Coordination, Higher Education, Organization, Organizational Change

Hall, Charles W. (1995). Interactive Televised Instruction: Factors To Consider. For the first 2 years of operation, the Instructional Television Services (ITS) at Mohave Community College, in Arizona, operated in a very traditional manner, utilizing two cameras and an operator at each site. To increase the efficiency of the television services, surveillance cameras were installed at sites and were operated from the district switchboard, eliminating the need for on site camera operators and saving the program over $400,000 in the ensuing 10 years. Currently, the ITS program runs approximately 6 days a week from 8:00 am to 10:00 pm. Other features of the reconfigured program include the following: (1) there are now four cameras at each site, covering the corner, back of room, overhead, and a desk camera showing instructor's examples; (2) the old permanently-on microphones have been replaced by push-to-activate mikes, reducing ambient noise; (3) wiring is in channels under the tables to discourage vandalism; (4) ceiling microphones have been installed to monitor classroom activities; (5) to facilitate communications between the district and sites, a courier service is in operation and the microwave system carries three telephone lines, two data lines, and one signal line to each site plus the audio and video signals for the ITS system; and (6) for security, tests and handouts are placed in special colored envelopes signed by faculty and all examinations are videotaped. The initial system was implemented in 1983-84 for $300,000, while this new phase cost $1.3 million.   [More]  Descriptors: Audio Equipment, Closed Circuit Television, Community Colleges, Distance Education

Griffin, Robert J. (1981). Refining Uses and Gratifications with a Human Information Processing Model. A study was conducted as part of a program to develop and test an individual level communications model. The model proposes that audience members bring to communications situations a set of learned cognitive processing strategies that produce cognitive structural representations of information in memory to facilitate the meeting of the various goals or needs that motivate media exposure. Among these strategies are imagery usage, total or partial avoidance, cross-contextual recoding, making inferences, active repetition, and memorizing. The model also proposes that an individual's exposure goals in a given situation may delineate task constraints on the cognitive processing system. In the study, 115 college students indicated that suggestion and environmental reinforcement were not strong enough to induce reliably the uses and gratifications orientations of surveillance, diversion, and anticipated communication in a laboratory setting. Self-reported use of imagery related positively to cognitive differentiation and negatively to subjects' thinking about other matters while reading, supporting a central assumption in the model that imagery strategy is resource and detail intensive.   [More]  Descriptors: Audiences, Cognitive Processes, College Students, Communication Research

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education. (1975). Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Veterinary Specialist, Blocks VII-XI, 1-4. These instructor materials and student texts, study guides, and workbooks for a postsecondary-level course to train veterinary specialists are one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. It is the second half of a two-part course (see Note) intended to provide training in food inspection; laboratory procedures; subprofessional duties concerning veterinary sciences; sanitary surveillance of food processing, storage, and service facilities; control and epidemiology of zoonotic diseases; and veterinary aspects of disaster medicine. Dealing with poultry and egg inspection, dairy products, miscellaneous foods, food technology, and animal services, this section contains five blocks of instruction covering eighty-eight hours of instruction: Dairy and Dairy Products (2 lessons), Miscellaneous Foods (2 lessons), Food Technology (2 lessons), and Animal Service and Zoonoses Control Activities (4 lesons). Instructor materials include a course chart, Speciality Training, for use in student evaluation, lesson plans, and a plan of instruction detailing unit content, lesson duration, objectives, and support material. Student materials include seven student texts, student workbook, and three study guide/workbooks. Contents are objectives, text readings, review exercises, and laboratory experiments. Commerical texts, military manuals, and audiovisuals are suggested but not provided.   [More]  Descriptors: Animal Husbandry, Behavioral Objectives, Birds, Course Descriptions

Kroupa, Eugene A.; Burnett, Claron (1973). Wisconsin Farmers' Use and Understanding of Broadcast News. Research Report. A survey of Wisconsin farmers in four market areas was made to determine their market information requirements, their surveillance of media market reports, and their understanding and use of market news received from the Wisconsin broadcast media. The survey was conducted as a follow-on to a study of the timing, frequency, and completeness of market news broadcast by Wisconsin radio and television stations. Specific objectives of the study were to document farmers' listening and viewing habits with regard to broadcast market news reports, to determine the kinds of market information farmers want from broadcast market reports, to rate the importance of mass media and personal sources of market information in making marketing decisions, to determine the usefulness of broadcast information in making various kinds of marketing and production decisions, and to measure farmers' understanding and knowledge of terms used in broadcast market news reports. The study data were obtained by personal interviews with 475 farmers. The findings of the study show that Wisconsin farmers have ready access to broadcast market price reports and other sources of market news information. The farmers cited radio as their single most valuable source of market news. The study found widespread misunderstanding of the USDA terms used in broadcast market reports.   [More]  Descriptors: Bulletins, Farmers, Information Needs, Marketing

Wishon, Phillip M.; And Others (1989). Hazard Patterns and Injury Prevention with Infant Walkers and Strollers. Mindful of the potential hazards associated with products intended for young children, this article examines pediatric accidents involving strollers and walkers. According to the latest figures available from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System of the United States (NEISS), more than 11,800 stroller injuries in 1987 were serious enough to require treatment in hospital emergency facilities. Approximately 10,300 of these injuries were suffered by children less than 4 years of age. Again, according to NEISS, more than 20,700 walker injuries in 1987 required emergency treatment. Almost all of the victims were children under 2 years of age. Results of research on walker-related injuries suggest that at least 36 percent of all children using walkers experience a fall while using them. While many of these mostly preventable accidents result in subclinical injuries that are not reported, when injuries do occur, head trauma is the most frequent. Discussion gives emphasis to prevention and recommendations are offered for the safe utilization of these devices. It is concluded that increased caregiver awareness of the need for safety precautions in the child-care environment could reduce the frequency of stroller- and walker-related accidents, and information on the safe use of these products should be incorporated into the standard information regarding accident prevention that might be made available to staff and parents.   [More]  Descriptors: Child Caregivers, Day Care, Early Childhood Education, Equipment

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. (1974). Highway Safety Program Manual: Volume 13: Traffic Engineering Services. Volume 13 of the 19-volume Highway Safety Program Manual (which provides guidance to State and local governments on preferred highway safety practices) focuses on traffic engineering services. The introduction outlines the purposes and objectives of Highway Safety Program Standard 13 and the Highway Safety Program Manual. Program development and operation (the scope of the engineering program, needs determination, priorities, manpower development, and traffic control devices) are presented. The need for a program implementation schedule (which establishes step-by-step work tasks to complete various facets of particular improvements) is specified in relation to improvements during maintenance, operational surveillance, high-accident location correction, hazardous location analysis, needs identification, effectiveness evaluation, and traffic regulations. Criteria and procedures for program evaluation and different types of reports (local, State, and Federal) are explained. Local government participation is outlined. Appendixes contain the Highway Safety Program Standard 13, Traffic Engineering Services; a glossary of definitions; a list of representative projects; a management guide for a Statewide inventory; guidelines for traffic control device maintenance inspections; guides for traffic sign, pavement marking, and traffic signal inventories; a list of resource organizations; and references.   [More]  Descriptors: Civil Engineering, Evaluation Criteria, Evaluation Methods, Federal Legislation

Lorber, Michael A. (1973). Computers Help 2000 Students Self-Pace Their Learning. Illinois State University operates a self-paced, competency-based teacher education program known as the Professional Sequence. It is based on the General Model of Instruction used at other universities and is organized around a series of self-instructional packages. Student progress is charted by a set of computer programs called the Surveillance System which provides daily and weekly feedback. These programs also report grades and registration information and provide data to assist faculty in evaluating and modifying the instructional packages. Students are also able to use the Pyramid System to work with audio tapes and tape-slide sequences; the system tracks program utilization and its 12k Nova control unit can process computer-assisted instructional programs. The self-pacing of programs by 2000 students is made possible by extensive use of computers. To the extent that allowing students to set their learning rates and select from a number of instructional modes humanizes education, computers enable the Professional Sequence to make learning more efficient and humane.   [More]  Descriptors: Audiotape Recordings, Competency Based Teacher Education, Computer Assisted Instruction, Computer Programs

Towers, Wayne M. (1985). A Replication and Reduction Approach to Weekday and Sunday Newspaper Readership and Some Uses and Gratifications. In direct replication of a previous study investigating newspaper readership and uses-and-gratifications statements, this study interviewed a parallel random sample from the same market as the initial study using the same questions. A telephone survey of 557 adults was conducted by trained undergraduates enrolled in an advanced research methods class, and each completed interview was verified through a second telephone call from different students in another course. Results suggested that newspaper subscribers were concerned with getting immediate knowledge of big news events from both weekday and Sunday papers, and that nonreaders of Sunday papers tended to regard newspapers as a way to pass time that was occasionally useful if a particular occurrence was of interest to them.  Statistical analysis of the original study revealed that three expected explanations of newspapers readers could be reduced to two groups of variables: (1) informational variables that combined surveillance of and participation in the surrounding world, and (2) a grouping that stressed diversion away from that world. Uses-and-gratifications research is not the single perspective that explains newspaper readership. However, the study highlighted the importance of classical replications as a way of evaluating and refining research insights. (Tables include questions asked in interviews and statistical data.) Descriptors: Adults, Media Research, Newspapers, Reading Habits

DeLay, Jeanine A. (1987). Computer Ethics Topics and Teaching Strategies. An overview of six major issues in computer ethics is provided in this paper: (1) unauthorized and illegal database entry, surveillance and monitoring, and privacy issues; (2) piracy and intellectual property theft; (3) equity and equal access; (4) philosophical implications of artificial intelligence and computer rights; (5) social consequences of robotics and the automated office, human skill obsolescence, and job displacement; and (6) computers as tools of war. Materials and activities which are appropriate for teaching computer ethics at the middle or high school level are described, including readings, arguable premises, movies, case studies, the Eliza software program, data exercises, guidelines/policies, debates, conferences, and content analysis exercises. Two of these strategies–the arguable premise and the case method–are expanded upon for the high school setting, and ways in which computer ethics might fit into the curriculum are discussed. The agenda of a new organization, the Center for Applied Ethics and New Technologies, which provides curricular material on computing technology ethical topics, is also introduced. Seven case studies for classroom use are appended. Descriptors: Artificial Intelligence, Case Method (Teaching Technique), Case Studies, Computers

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education. (1975). Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Veterinary Specialist, Blocks III-VI. These instructor materials and student texts, study guides, and workbooks for a postsecondary-level course to train veterinary specialists are one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. It is the first half of a two-part course (see Note) intended to provide training in food inspection; laboratory procedures; subprofessional duties concerning veterinary sciences; sanitary surveillance of food processing, storage, and service facilities; control and epidemiology of zoonotic diseases; and veterinary aspects of disaster medicine. Dealing with microbiology, food handling, food laboratory, and meat and meat products, this section contains four blocks of instruction covering 122 hours of instruction: microbiology (3 lessons), medical aspects of food handling (2 lessons), food laboratory (3 lessons), and meat and meat products (5 lessons). Instructor materials include a course chart, Specialty Training Standard, for use in student evaluation, lesson plans, and a plan of instruction detailing unit content, lesson duration, objectives, and support material. Student materials include four student texts, study guide, two study guides/workbooks, and programmed text. Contents are objectives, text readings, review exercises, and laboratory experiments. Commercial texts, military manuals, and audiovisuals are suggested but not provided.   [More]  Descriptors: Animal Husbandry, Behavioral Objectives, Course Descriptions, Curriculum Guides

Stevenson, Robert L.; Ismach, Arnold H. (1979). Newspaper Readership and Community Ties; Precision Journalism: Coming of Age. ANPA News Research Report No. 18. The first of two articles in this report offers a survey of how community ties lead to various psychological needs that are the motivation for newspaper reading. It identifies three distinct audience segments: the traditional audience, with permanent bonds to the community, whose need for information, guidance, and community surveillance leads to the reading of hard news, editorials, and background features; the more mobile readers, less tied to the community, who use the newspaper for entertainment and as a guide to leisure opportunities; and the peripheral readers, with few contacts to the community, who use the newspaper to maintain vicarious links with the community and to fill time that is not taken up by demands of family, job, and community activities. The second article reviews the origins of precision journalism (the use of social science research methods by editors and reporters), offers examples of past and future applications in the newsroom, and outlines ways that any newspaper can begin using these reporting techniques. Descriptors: Audiences, Community Involvement, Journalism, Media Research

Barron, Arleen S. (1975). Assessing Research Needs Related to Education of the Handicapped. Final Report. Four conferences involving key special education personnel were held on research needs related to: 1) career education for the handicapped, 2) education for the severely handicapped, 3) early childhood education for the handicapped, and 4) development of personnel to serve the handicapped. Major concerns of the career education conference were development of skills for leisure time activities as well as work and the need to find and use existing knowledge to develop methodologies and programs. Themes of the conference on education of the severely handicapped included the need for an adequate system of information exchange among researchers and practitioners, the need for research to be directed to the most critical problems and to be nationally coordinated, and the importance of continuous surveillance and longitudinal data collection. Stressed in the conference on early childhood education for the handicapped were the need for improved early diagnosis, appropriate intervention, research on programs and agencies to develop total service models, and the identification of personnel competencies. Focused on in the conference on the development of personnel to serve the handicapped was the importance of pupil achievement as the basis for judging personnel and program success. Areas of common concern across conferences included the need for information systems and the impact of affirmative action mandates. Primary outcomes of each conference were an annotated bibliography and proceedings of the conference. The major portion of the document consists of appendixes such as the conference schedules and participants and conference recommendations.   [More]  Descriptors: Career Education, Conference Reports, Early Childhood Education, Educational Needs

Surlin, Stuart H. (1985). Jamaican Call-In Radio: A Uses and Gratification Analysis. Noting that radio call-in programs seem to contain the elements for active audience involvement and participation, a study was conducted to examine the hypothesis that information gain and surveillance are the primary gratifications sought through call-in radio programs, especially in a culture that has a strong oral tradition and relatively few sources of mediated information. One adult from each of 268 randomly selected households in Kingston, Jamaica, was interviewed. Each respondent answered questions relating to (1) frequency of listening to Jamaica's 10 call-in radio programs, (2) perceived "usefulness" of information provided within each program, (3) perceived uses/gratifications, (4) radio attitudes, (5) significance of radio or other medium as an information source, and (6) demographic data. The results substantiated the hypothesis. Lower socioeconomic status, less educated, more alienated, and radio-oriented respondents were most likely to listen to call-in programs, find the information useful, and seek the greatest gratification from them. The call-in programs featuring experts in health-care and legal advice were rated most useful, while the open-mike programs were generally more popular. Descriptors: Cultural Differences, Foreign Countries, Information Needs, Information Sources

Maier, Milton H.; Fuchs, Edmund F. (1978). Differential Validity of the Army Aptitude Areas for Predicting Army Job Training Performance of Blacks and Whites. Technical Paper 312. Validation studies were conducted on nine revised aptitude areas of the Army Classification Battery (ACB) to determine whether ACB scores provided an equitable indication of the qualifications of blacks and whites for training in major groups of Army jobs. The aptitude areas were: combat, field artillery, electronics repair, operators and food, surveillance and communications, mechanical maintenance, general maintenance, clerical, and skilled technical. The validity of these aptitude scores was compared by a three-step analysis, to job training scores (final course grades) for 12,355 whites and 1,772 blacks. (1) Comparison of ACB scores of whites and blacks showed sizeable differences. (2) Aptitude area scores correlated highly with counterpart training scores for both races. (3) For six of the eight major job areas, both white and black trainees were selected appropriately for their job categories. It was concluded that the scores were valid enough to justify their uses in identifying more effective personnel; furthermore, a regression analysis indicated that ACB scores have equivalent meaning for both races. Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Aptitude Tests, Blacks, Enlisted Personnel

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